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Sarah Hartman

Director (Film/TV)

United States

“Storyrocket is a great resource for screenwriters and directors to put together a pitch for their films, and organize all of the information for interested investors and actors. I look forward to continuing to use the site for my scripts.”

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  • TV

    Aug 14, 2018

    by

    Storyrocket

    CDM – SELL YOUR BOOKS NOT YOUR SOUL (PART 2)

    Last week, we addressed the many challenges facing writers in our new age of broken barriers and floods of books and how far we all go with our self-promotion. Some of us decide this new age of social promotion is not for us, while others embrace it. For anyone who sniffs at the suggestion that real relationships can be formed from online ones, I suggest you join us at the Dublin Writers Conference, an annual event born out of social media.     The challenge for author collaborators, as they embrace all this, is to ensure their work is of […]

  • Aug 10, 2018

    by

    Laurence O'Bryan

    CDM – Sell Your Books Not Your Soul (PART 1)

    One of the many challenges facing writers in our new age of broken barriers and floods of books, is how far we all go with our self-promotion. Some of us decide this new age of social promotion is not for us, while others embrace it. But to embrace online promotion without a strategy we can believe in, which respects our goals as writers, as well as our readers, places us on shaky ground. Are writers destined to be hucksters selling our wares at the side of the internet superhighway? Or do we have a mission for all this Tweeting and […]

  • May 14, 2018

    by

    Linda Rodriguez

    GET OUT and A QUIET PLACE: THE NEW SOCIAL THRILLERS (PART 3)

    CHILDREN’S SAFETY, INTERNET MONSTERS, FEMINIST EMPOWERMENT Lat week I went to a theater to see John Krasinski’s A Quiet Place (2018) so I could have that communal experience Peele talks about and because it was doing so well critically and financially. Also, because after Puerto Rico experienced a post-Apocalyptic situation during the 2017 hurricane season, I’m now interested in seeing if filmmakers get it right. A Quiet Place does a pretty good job, except for the electricity and running water, but they hit it on the nail with the emphasis on lack of safety. In fact, Emily Blunt says in […]

  • May 8, 2018

    by

    Linda Rodriguez

    GET OUT and A QUIET PLACE: THE NEW SOCIAL THRILLERS (PART 2)

    TO EXPERIENCE SOMETHING TOGETHER I recently experienced how watching a film together turns on the “communing” and “empathy” and “fun” factor when I improvised an “otherness” double feature for my film students at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez. First we watched Night of the Living Dead and throughout the show in one class section there was intense silence coupled with nervous jumpiness while in another section there was near constant loud cheering on of the main character, Ben, played by African-American Duane Jones. So all fun! But the ending was a bad let down for all: When Ben gets unceremoniously shot, […]

  • Apr 30, 2018

    by

    Linda Rodriguez

    GET OUT and A QUIET PLACE: THE NEW SOCIAL THRILLERS (PART 1)

    Jordan Peele has called his recent Oscar winner, Get Out (2017), a “social thriller,” but what does he mean by that? Let’s see… In a recent CNN interview, Peele states that as a child he told a scary story around a campfire (an iconic storytelling image!), and seeing his classmates’ spellbound reaction, he realized that: “Wow! What was my fear, it’s kind of become my power, and wielding that artistry felt good.” In writing the screenplay that became the film Get Out, Peele wielded the power of storytelling he had discovered as a child to explore 21st century race relations […]

  • Feb 22, 2018

    by

    Linda Rodriguez

    THE SHAPE OF WATER: The Princess is All Grown Up!

    CRONOS (1993) Guillermo del Toro wrote and directed his first feature, Cronos, when he was only 28 years old. With a budget of $2 million, del Toro shot this unforgettable film in about 8 weeks and it went on to win 9 Ariel Awards in Mexico, the Critic’s Prize at France’s Cannes Film Festival, and many other awards. Cronos, set in Veracruz in 1536, is a re-telling of the vampire-monster myth. While the film’s title alludes to the disturbing story of the Greek deity Cronus, who castrated his father and ate his children, the film’s setting hints at the violence […]

  • Jan 15, 2018

    by

    Linda Rodriguez

    COCO: From Sharks to Alebrijes

    When I heard that Coco would be screened at the Excélsior theater in the town of Cabo Rojo in Puerto Rico last December, I quickly added the event to my calendar. In the 19th C., the Excélsior began its life as a traditional theater, opening its doors with the premiere of Salvador Brau y Asencio’s play Héroe y Martir (1871). And even though in 2016 it was converted to a cinema, today the Excélsior, and the art school next to it housed in a building dating to 1903, strike me as welcomed flashbacks to more romantic and humanitarian times.   […]

  • TV

    Nov 14, 2017

    by

    Linda Rodriguez

    A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH: Starved for Technicolor in Puerto Rico

    On November 1st, 1946, A Matter of Life and Death premiered in London, England. It had been written, directed and produced by The Archers creative duo, Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger. It was shot in Technicolor and the DP had been Jack Cardiff who in 2001 was awarded an Oscar for Lifetime Achievement as Master of Light and Color.   The film premiered at the Leicester Square Empire Theatre a short walk away from Piccadilly Circus. King George VI and his wife, Queen Elizabeth II’s parents, attended. It must have been a “full dress affair” as Conductor 71 (Marius Goring) […]

  • TV

    Oct 23, 2017

    by

    Linda Rodriguez

    BLADE RUNNER 2049: A COLD CASE WARMS UP

    Philip K. Dick’s Organic Androids In the novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (1968) Philip K. Dick describes an Earth that has undergone a human-made cataclysm,“World War Terminus,” and no one remembers why it began or if any side had won. The specific enemy is left unnamed but the author mentions the Pentagon and Rand Corporation, meaning that the USA was at least one of the involved parties. Moreover, the strange dust covering everything, blocking out the sun, and killing most animals had not been a by-product that neither the military nor business interests had included in their “cost” […]

  • Oct 12, 2017

    by

    Fabia Scali

    Own Your Message

    The message, in Roman Jakobson’s Theory of Communication, is what you want to communicate to the receiving end of the conversation. The Romans used the words of Cato the Elder to describe its importance: Rem tene, verba sequentur – grasp the concept, and the words will follow. Albert Einstein delved even deeper in the importance of being able to convey the message in multiple ways, including the simplest, when he said that “You do not really understand something unless you can explain it to your grandmother”. Awareness on what we want to communicate greatly improves the delivery of the message: […]

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